perjantai 28. huhtikuuta 2017

Pocket Geiger counter for Smartphones - Chernobyl and Fukushima

Pocket Geiger counter for Smartphones - $59
Remember Chernobyl disaster on 1986 and Fukushima on 2011



Chernobyl 1986 fallout. C-137. Scandinavia pollution map.
Radiation landed on the Seabeds. (Helcom)



Fukushima fallout on air on 2011






Fukushima fallout on the Pacific Sea (Enenews)


Almost all bottom trawled fishes as pollock, salmon and
herring are typically contamined by radioactive  Cesium 137. 


NOW YOU CAN SEE ON YOUR MOBILE PHONE THE RADIATION, ALREADY AT YOUR FOOD STORE! 

DIGITAL | TECHNOLOGY | FUKUSHIMA INNOVATION. PATENTED, CE and ROHM certified.





Compatible with iPhones and Android- phones. 

 SMART GEIGER COUNTER (FSG-001)
FEATURES
• Handy
• Easy to Carry
• Quick and Accurate Data
• Reasonable Price
• No Battery Needed

Personal Geiger Monitor for Smartphone
Anytime, Anywhere
No more worries on radioactivity for my family
You can easily check the danger of radioactivity
just place it near the suspicious object!

Online Stores: http://testel.fi/shop and testel.ecwid.com
HelpDesk, SKYPE: matti_sales

Paypal and Credit Cards Accepted
Stores are powered and Secured by Ecwid Inc.
144 West D Street
Suite 103
Encinitas, CA 92024 USA







tiistai 25. huhtikuuta 2017

Fukushima Radiation in U.S. West Coast Tuna

Fukushima Radiation in U.S. West Coast Tuna 

In March 2011, in association with the Great Tohoku earthquake and resultant tsunami, there was an accident at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant on the east coast of Japan.
This accident released the radionuclides cesium 
134Cs and 137Cs into the ocean next to the plant, exposing marine life to radioactive materials.
Pictured below are model simulations (using dye) on the long-term dispersal of 
137Cs released into the Pacific Ocean off Fukushima following the Daiichi nuclear accident, 43 days, 367 days, and 1412 day after (up to down).
While many of the exposed marine organisms remain around Japan, a number of species are highly migratory and swim across the North Pacific to the West Coast of North America. 




Pictured above are model simulations (using dye) of the long-term dispersal of Cs-137 released into the Pacific Ocean off Fukushima following the Daiichi nuclear accident, 43 days, 367 days, and 1412 day after (left to right). Image credit: E. Behrens, F.U. Schwarzkopf, J.F. Lübbecke and C.W. Böning, GEOMAR. Study and full-length simulation can be found at http://iopscience.iop.org/1748-9326/7/3/034004/

Two examples of these migratory fish are Pacific bluefin tuna (Thunnus orientalis) and albacore tuna (Thunnus alalunga), and both134Cs and 137Cs have been detected in these species caught in the eastern Pacific. For public health, the levels of radiation are very low and far below levels that are considered cause for concern.  In a recent study of fifty bluefin tuna sampled off the U.S. West Coast in 2012, the smaller bluefin (recent migrants from Japan) had 134Cs (0.7 ± 0.2 Becquerels (Bq)/kg) and elevated 137Cs (2.0 ± 0.5 Bq/kg) in their white muscle tissue, while most larger, older fish had no 134Cs and only background levels of 137Cs.1 For scientists the 134Cs and 137Cs served as a marker indicating migratory pathways. If, for example, a Pacific bluefin tuna had detectable levels of 134Cs (which decays relatively quickly), it indicated that they recently migrated from Japan; this has provided important insight into the dynamics of tuna migration in the Pacific.

The Basics of Radiation

What is radiation?
By definition, radiation is energy in the form of waves or energized particles. The two types are:
  • Ionizing radiation: has so much energy, it can knock electrons out of atoms and create an ion, or unbalanced atom. This process can change living cells and cause mutations in DNA and damage in tissues, which poses health risks for humans. Examples include x-ray machines, cosmic rays, and nuclear radioactive elements.  
  • Non-ionizing radiation: does not have enough energy to cause ionization, but can move atoms around. Examples include radio waves, microwaves, and visible light. 

Sources of Radiation



Where does radiation exposure come from?
Radiation has always been a natural part of our environment, with sources in the soil, water, and air. Man-made sources include mining, power generation, nuclear medicine, military applications, and consumer products. According to the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP), the average person in the U.S. is exposed to an average annual radiation dose of 620 millirem (6.2 millisieverts), which is not considered harmful.3  The termbackground radiation refers to the radiation that is always present in the environment, mostly from natural sources and a small portion from man-made sources. Use this Personal Annual Radiation Dose Calculator from the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission to see what your personal exposure is.  
Sources of radiation to the average person. Adapted from the Environmental Protection Agency,

What is radioactive decay and a half-life?
Radioactive decay is defined as the process by which a radionuclide releases energy (in the form of alpha particles, beta particles, or gamma rays) over time, transforming into a different state until the element is stable again. As they decay, radionuclides may transform into different elements completely. The half-life is the rate at which a radionuclide decays to half its original atoms and is measured as time, ranging from mere seconds, minutes, or millions of years.4
How do radioactive materials impact humans?
The severity of the impact of radiation depends on the exposure, either chronic (continuous exposure over a long period of time) or acute (short-term exposure). Radioactive materials which release energy in the form of ionizing radiation may cause damage to living cells by changing the state of atoms inside genetic material (DNA), in turn causing mutations to DNA. However, type of exposure is important (internal vs. external), the dose, the radionuclide's half-life, where it concentrates in your body, and how your body metabolizes it. Experts disagree on the exact definition and degree of "low-dose" exposure, but the protection standards for the U.S. conservatively assumes that any exposure to radiation carries some risk and risk increases with dose.3
What are cesium isotopes?
137Cs and 134Cs are radionuclides produced by nuclear fission for use in medical devices and gauges and is also one of the byproducts of nuclear fission processes in nuclear reactors and nuclear weapons testing. 137Cs and 134Cs were already present in the environment before the Fukushima Nuclear Disaster due to nuclear testing in the 1950s and 1960s, nuclear fuel reprocessing in the 1980s, and the Chernobyl accident in 1986. However, the accident in 2011 supplements these established sources, and the long half-life of 137Cs (30.04 years) means it will persist in the environment for quite some time when compared to that of 134Cs (2.07 years).

How does radiocesium impact fish?
The concern for 137Cs in the marine environment is due to its intake and diffusion into fat content in biological tissue of fish and the potential for bio-accumulation through the food web. Marine fish have been shown to acquire Cs from both the aqueous phase and from diet. Of fifty bluefin tuna sampled off the U.S. West Coast in 2012, the smaller bluefin (recent migrants from Japan) had 134Cs (0.7 ± 0.2 Bq/kg) and elevated 137Cs (2.0 ± 0.5 Bq/kg) in their white muscle tissue, while most larger, older fish had no 134Cs and only background levels of137Cs.  For scientists, the radionuclides serve as a marker indicating migratory pathways. If, for example, a Pacific bluefin tuna had detectable levels of 134Cs (which decays relatively quickly), it indicated that they recently migrated from Japan. 

1. Madigan, Daniel J., et al. "Radiocesium in Pacific Bluefin Tuna Thunnus orientalis in 2012 validates new tracer technique." Environmental science & technology 47.5 (2013): 2287-2294.2. World Nuclear Association, http://www.world-nuclear.org/information-library/safety-and-security/radiation-and-health/radiation-and-life.aspx3. Environmental Protection Agency, https://www.epa.gov/radiation/radiation-sources-and-doses#self
4. International Bureau of Weights and Measures (BIPM), http://www.bipm.org/metrology/ionizing-radiation/units.html
5. Mathews, T., Fisher, N. S. "Dominance of dietary intake of metals in marine elasmobranch and teleost fish." Sci. Total Environ. 2009, 407 (18), 5156−5161.


Learn more...


 Radiation 

Relevant Literature

 Seafood information


Last modified: 7/28/2016


keskiviikko 19. huhtikuuta 2017

Pocket Geiger counter is a breath of fresh air

 | 

Pocket Geiger counter is a breath of fresh air

BY 
 Go to Shop - Contact Form - Ask price.
STAFF WRITER

DEC 5, 2012 ARTICLE HISTORY 
IT’S SO SMALL THAT IT COULD EASILY BE MISTAKEN FOR A SMALL PACK OF MINTS. IN FACT, IF YOU ACTUALLY HAVE A PACKET OF FRISK ON YOU HANG ON TO IT, IT’LL COME IN HANDY.

Pocket Geiger, one of many gadgets on display at the Maker Faire Tokyo 2012 last weekend, is a handheld radiation detector developed by engineers and scientists belonging to “Radiation-watch.org” — a pro bono project aimed at making high-quality radiation monitoring easier, cheaper and more citizen-oriented.
Founder Yang Ishigaki said the device uses tiny PIN photodiodes, which are commonly used as light sensors for infrared remote-control devices but can also pick up Gamma-ray radiation.
“We do all of our manufacturing at a factory in Ishinomaki (in Miyagi Prefecture) that was a longtime Sony subcontractor until it was hit by the (March 2011) tsunami,” Ishigaki said.
“So far we’ve sold about 20,000 units, and have helped keep the jobs of 30 people there.”
The group started production in the summer of 2011, and three versions of the Geiger counters are now available — ranging from the cheapest DIY model, which fits into an empty Frisk mints case (¥1,850, without the case), to the latest model with a high-quality sensor and a sleek, metallic case (¥6,450).
The Pocket Geiger can be hooked to smart phones to show aerial radiation levels in as short as two minutes. The detectors have been certified by the Dutch Metrology Institute, which conducted the calibration tests. Users can upload and share data using a free iPhone/Android application. So far, data from around a million locations across eastern Japan have been shared, Ishigaki said. “Lately, many businesses and universities have shown interest,” he said. “They say they need to set up a lot more monitoring posts on (contaminated) farmlands and forests. We would like to eventually shift our services to such demands.”
______________

Future Tech Smart Lab Personal Environment monitors
  
- Geiger, EM, UV, 
Temp/Humidity


 Go to Shop or ask price







Personal Environment monitor
Easy and Quick Checkers
Now, anyone can check the radiation at anytime and anywhere!
It’s a tiny, beautifully designed with Aluminum body personal environment monitor that connects to your phone to measure, collect and analyze the hidden qualities of your surroundings.
Connect Smart Checker to your Smart Phone using plug for measurement of Radiation / electromagnetic fields (EMF) / UV (Ultra violet ) / Temperature & Humidity / Smart V(Voltage)
/ IR(Infrared rays) / VL(Visible ray) Checker Fully powered by your smart phone device, No battery or charger required (except temp checker )

ersonal Environment monitor


SMART GEIGER COUNTER (FSG-001)

 SMART GEIGER

FEATURES
• Handy
• Easy to Carry
• Quick and Accurate Data
• Reasonable Price
• No Battery Needed
Personal Geiger Monitor for Smartphone
Anytime, Anywhere
No more worries on radioactivity for my family
You can easily check the danger of radioactivity
just place it near the suspicious object!

FREE Sensor Application
Connect to Smart phone ear jack
Sensor unit (Aluminum)
Connect Jack (Ear Jack)

Smart Geiger is a miniature Geiger Counter.
It detect low levels of hard beta and gamma particles. Running the test for longer than two minutes will yield more accurate results.
Professionally precise. Smart Geiger reveals highly accurate information about the radioactive particles around you and how they might be affecting you.

Item Description
Radiation Measurement Gamma, X-ray
Sensor Type Semiconductor Sensor
Range Survey Meter : 0.1~200 μSv/h
Measurement error < ―15%
Size Length 30mm (include Ear Jack : 47mm), Φ10
Weight 6 g
User Interface Smart Phone ( Earphone Jack)
Material Al (Aluminum)
Linearity 97% at 20 ~ 120 μSv/h
※ Reference testing reports.



SMART GEIGER PRO (SGP-001)


High sensitive and tiny smart Geiger counter that measures even the environmental radiation.
10 times more powerfully upgraded!
More widely, more accurately!
• Measure the environmental radiation with its high sensitive sensor
• Measure the radiation in the air with its wider sensor
• Anyone can easily use it
• Convenient to carry around
• Quick and intuitive measurement
• Reasonable price

WIRELESS GEIGER COUNTER (BSG-001)



Personal Environment monitor
Item Description
Main Chip Nordic nRF51822, Bluetooth Low energy/ 2.4GHz RF system on chip
Chipset ARM Cortex-M0 32bit processor
Function BLE service of the environmental radioactivity
Antenna Pattern Antenna
Sensor type Semiconductor Sensor
Radiation measurement Gamma, X-ray
Measurement rage Survey meter : 0.05~200uSv/h
Measurement error <―15% (minimum error ―

Personal Environment monitor
Copyright(c) 2016 Technonia, Inc. All Rights Reserved (http://www.technonia.com) Page 19
Smart Geiger is a miniature Geiger Counter.
It detect low levels of hard beta and gamma particles.
Running the test for longer than two minutes will yield
more accurate results.

SMART EM CHECKER (FEC-001)

Measuring at a food store in Finland - see Video

Move around with Smart EM checker to detect electromagnetic fields.
Watch the different amounts appear in real time on your screen.
Small size electromagnetic fields measuring instrument
click

Item Description
measurements Electromagnetic field (EMF)
minimum response 1 V/m
Range 1 ~ 2,000 V/m
Frequency 16 Hz ~ 100 kHz
Size Length 30mm (include Ear Jack : 47mm), Φ10
Weight 6 g
User Interface Smart Phone ( Earphone Jack)
Material Al (Aluminum)
Sensor Type Semiconductor Sensor
MIC
※ International regulatory baseline low-frequency electromagnetic field : 10 or 40 V / m. Below

SMART UV CHECKER (FUV-001)




Personal Environment monitor
Item Description
measurements UV(Ultra Violet)
Range 240~380 nm
Detects UVA, UVB
UVI (UV Index) range 0 ~ 12
UV Power 0 ~ 6mW/cm2
Measurement error ― 10%
Workable Temperature : -20 ~ 50 ℃
Workable Humidity < 80 %
Size Length 30mm (include Ear Jack : 47mm), Φ10
Weight 6 g
User Interface Smart Phone ( Earphone Jack)
Material Al (Aluminum)
Sensor Type Semiconductor Sensor


SMART Temp/Humidity CHECKER (FTC-001)




___________________




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